Hospital Stuff

This will be another rambling post as I’m writing from the hospital yet again. I stayed here for a week before Typhoon Glenda hit and I came back just a few days after. Been here for another full week doing errands and stuff. “Stuff” includes buying meds and supplies, getting blood, and generally just…being here…for any instructions whatsoever from the doctors or the nurses or any papers that have to be signed before tests and procedures can proceed.

So, I’m just…here…now.  And it looks like I will be staying for another week or until he gets better. Thank God, he seems to be recovering.

Save for the lady pharmacist and a few guards, they have the nicest people around here — the doctors, nurses, nursing aides, rad techs, pulmo techs, cleaning ladies. They all look so friendly and familiar now. Even the shopkeepers at the 7-11 are familiar faces. I figured out the shifts so I actually have an idea who is manning the store right now. Meanwhile, the cashier at Isla Cafe was pirated and she is now dispensing medical supplies at the ground floor. I also know from experience that some medicines and supplies are much cheaper at a nearby hospital so I walk all the way there most of the time to get some of the meds. That’s how long I’ve been staying here; I practically live here.

And this much I’ve learned: The hospital is such a sad, lonely place. Sure, sick people go here to get better, but uncertainty hangs in the air. It is the uncertainty that is unsettling.

I don’t know if this painting has the power to calm nerves, quiet sobs, hear prayers, and assure people on the brink of hopelessness…

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…but it is located right outside this…

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… beside this ugly, passive-aggressive poster.

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The Smoker’s Body is prominently displayed on an easel stand, visible to the relatives of MICU patients. What an interesting piece of “art” it is.

Speaking of art, I found these at the main lobby:

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Lung and Jelly Beans (Kidding! This is "LCP 2001" by RS Cheng, M.D.)

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I Heart My Lungs (No, actually this is "Nature and Humanity" by RS Cheng, M.D.)

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My favorite: A giant doodle from "wewilldoodle". The banderitas are no match to the dreary lighting.

But wait, there’s more! For some strange reason, there’s a photo exhibit at the hospital lobby as well.

Presenting: The Royal Kingdom of Bhutan!

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So now, I’m thinking of going to Bhutan…

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…after he gets better, that is.

Told ya, rambling, meandering.

It’s the mid-day visiting hour. Have to go and do “hospital stuff” now! Bye!

*Edit: There’s a logical explanation to the photo exhibit after all, and it’s here: http://eddie-concepcion.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-land-of-thunder-dragon-dream-photo.html?m=1

Kudos to VISTA for the beautiful images of Bhutan! VISTA is composed of Garrie David, Ricci Jimenez, Connie Padilla, Tony Ramos, Keith Sundiang and Eddie Concepcion.

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Quote: The story as a conversation

“When you tell a story in the kitchen to a friend, it’s full of mistakes and repetitions. It’s good to avoid that in literature, but still, a story should feel like a conversation. It’s not a lecture.” (Novelist Isabel Allende’s advice to aspiring writers)

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pixabay.com

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25 common words that I got wrong (or how my bad grammar is so nauseous, it’s making me and the people around me nauseated)

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pixabay.com

Here’s a useful article from lifehack.org. I learned so much from this.

My favorite is item #20: plethora.

What you think it means: A lot of something.
What it really means: More than is needed.

Plethora simply means that there is more of something than is needed. For instance, you may think that 5,000 people is a plethora of people. However, when you put them into a hockey arena that seats 13,000 people, it’s actually less than half capacity and therefore not a plethora. If you had 13,500 people in that same arena, that would be a plethora of people.

Read on and weep.

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/25-common-words-that-youve-got-wrong.html

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At the hospital

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pixabay.com

Guarded, she weakly looked at the hospital bill. It had been a week and she knew what was coming. She forced herself to read and understand  the words and numbers that swam before her. Her face fell. It was eerie how the paper turned translucent as her clouded eyes failed her. It was horrifying and more sickening than the illness itself.

Based on a melodramatic version of a true story. Hahah! The hospital’s billing section and the cashier really are some of the scariest places on earth. Boo!

The Prompt: Three Word Wednesday – Eerie, Guarded, Translucent

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Quote: Pick up the story’s rhythm

“When you feel the story is beginning to pick up rhythm—the characters are shaping up, you can see them, you can hear their voices, and they do things that you haven’t planned, things you couldn’t have imagined—then you know the book is somewhere, and you just have to find it, and bring it, word by word, into this world.” (Novelist Isabel Allende’s advice to aspiring writers)

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Fifteen

So I signed up for yet another social media account, LinkedIn, and realized, as I typed out my online CV, that I’ve been working for 15 years straight! (Slow clap. Tears.) 15 years! And I’ve been meticulously paying all my taxes! Yay!

The greatest feeling is looking back at my own experiences and heaving a sigh of relief to say, “Yessssss, I enjoyed and endured all of that” — the bad and good bosses, the GM who didn’t like me for the job vs. the director who trusted and believed in me, the manager who questioned my motives vs. the mentor who vouched for me and came to my defense, the most endearing and most annoying co-workers, the pat-on-the-back moments vs. the kick-on-the-shin moments, the laughable mistakes vs. the please-kill-me-now mistakes, the crazy working hours, late late lunches that merge with merienda, the instant pancit canton dinners and the lucheons at fancy restaurants, the art exhibits ohmygawhd the art exhibits, the free brewed coffee from the kitchen, the free lunch with a salad bar at the dungeon/bat cave/cafeteria, overtime work without extra pay, Christmas and NY holidays at work, the monthly tax-free SC, the rainy day commutes, the last trip MRT rides from Ayala to North Avenue Station, the official coverage assignments where I spent my own money just because I loved my job, meeting and interviewing so many interesting people, covering the old Chefs on Parade, photo shoots of all sorts, working with F&B to invent and actually give a name to the Drink of the Month, photo exhibit all-nighters, typhoon season power restoration all-nighters (with MagicSing!), … so many memories.

That chunk of a paragraph just made me smile. Really, that wasn’t so bad at all. :-)

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