How to write a memo (a blog’s story)

Anyone can write a memorandum (memo). At least, that’s what I thought until a charming old lady from another department asked me oh-so-nicely to write one for her. I was not reporting to her in any way so why she wouldn’t let her own secretary do it will always remain a mystery.

Or not.

In this day and age of autocorrect spelling and grammar options, believe it or not, some employees still find something as routine as writing a memo to a boss, peer, or subordinate a dreadful task. I know I still do, sometimes.

Why is it so hard to make a straightforward and well thought of and written memo? No one has ever won a Palanca award for writing memos but it is an important skill to ensure effective communication within any organization.

Good business writing is a crucial skill that practically everyone in a company — from the employee who drafts memos to the decision makers who sign these – should know.

A memo is nothing but a brief formatted document that is used within a company or organization to exchange information. Quite simply, it is used to (1) seek information, (2) call for action, or (3) respond to other’s requests for information or action.

Especially in huge companies, the simplest, most straightforward and understandable memos can prevent total chaos.

So this is what I believe in: Anyone who can write a decent memo can help make the office a better place to work in.

And I dare say, because it seems to be the most basic thing: Anyone who knows how to write a memo can go on and write practically ANYTHING.

Related post: How to write a memo (literally)

2 comments

  1. Kim P.

    Yep, I agree. Even though writing comes naturally to some people, like myself, I have always believed that anyone who write at can learn to write great things one day. It just take perseverance and practice and most importantly, passion. Great post! I enjoyed it…

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